Faculty Workshops


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From Drizzle to Downpour: New Approaches to Brainstorming

While writing habits and routines are essential to student success, the demands of college-level courses require students to adapt and update their writing processes. New genres, unfamiliar disciplinary conventions, and lengthy research requirements can make starting any paper daunting, especially for first-year students. This workshop will focus on implementing brainstorming tools that both foster a deeper understanding of individual writing opportunities as well as the writing process more broadly. Come share your successes and challenges and collaborate with The Writing Center in a relaxed setting.


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PAUSE AND EFFECT: COMMAS, COLONS, AND creating meaning

How many times have students been asked to read their work aloud and listen for a pause to see whether or not a comma is necessary? We frequently hear students say, "It just feels like there needs to be a comma there." While the pause test might help students add commas after introductory elements or dependent clauses at the start of sentences, it will not help them distinguish between essential and non-essential information. In this workshop, we will focus on techniques to help students recognize the rhetorical role punctuation plays in their writing.  


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WATCH OUT FOR THE PLOT HOLE: GUIDING STUDENTS FROM SUMMARY TO ANALYSIS

Many writing opportunities ask students to use different types of data in order to support their observations. From literary analysis essays to research papers, students must gather, hierarchize, and mobilize information from a variety of sources. Many times, however, students fall into the familiar trap of summarizing a work of fiction, scholarly article, or body of research instead of using it to further their own ideas. This workshop will model ways to guide students away from dangerous plot holes and towards original analysis.


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THINKING BACKWARDS: INTEGRATING REVERSE OUTLINES INTO WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

Most students are used to developing an outline or mapping out their ideas before they begin writing. For many college students, brainstorming has become second nature; however, what about after a draft is completed? Reverse outlining helps students recognize the main idea of each paragraph, identify the logical connections between successive ideas, and develop crucial revision skills. Join The Writing Center for a conversation about how reverse outlining can help your students - and you - save time and energy.


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GETTING IT RIGHT THE FIRST SECOND WHATEVER TIME: ENCOURAGING REAL REVISION

Oftentimes, students and faculty have very different definitions of revision. For many students, revision is a simple process: just address comments from instructors or peer reviewers and proofread. In contrast, faculty recognize that revision is a process - an integral step - towards understanding both the content and genre of a particular writing opportunity. In this interactive workshop, we will examine what we are asking students to do when we ask them to “revise” and devise ways we can promote meaningful revision.